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Faculty

Jonathan Dueck

Vice President Academic and Academic Dean; Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology

Jonathan Dueck

Email

jdueck:@:cmu.ca

Phone

204.487.3300 x615

Office

B232

Jonathan Dueck is Vice President Academic and Academic Dean, and Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology at Canadian Mennonite University. He previously taught at The George Washington University, Duke University, the University of Maryland and the University of Alberta.

He deeply values working with faculty on innovative, engaged research, and creative and adventurous teaching; and with students on knowledge-making in and out of the classroom. His research in writing and pedagogy centres on teacher research for an on-the-ground understanding of University writing in global context.

He is a founding co-editor of Prompt, a journal of innovative writing-in-the-disciplines assignments and teaching reflections. His ethnomusicological research explores musical practice in affinity groups—North American religions, and sporting communities.

He is coeditor of the Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities (2016), author of Congregational Music, Conflict, and Community (2017, Routledge) and Performing Basketball (Oxford, under contract), and has published articles in Ethnomusicology, the Journal of American Folklore, and Popular Music and Society.

Areas of Teaching

Ethnomusicology, Music, Anthropology, Writing Studies

Education

PhD, University of Alberta (2003)

Work in Detail

Teaching

MUSC-2260 – Worlds of Music (Winter 2018)

Research

Congregational Music, Conflict, and Community. Monograph. New York: Routledge, 2017.

The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities Edited collection. Co-edited with Suzel Reily. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2016.

Co-authored with Suzel Ana Reily. "Introduction." The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities, eds. Suzel Ana Reily and Jonathan Dueck. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press.

"Music as Shared Space in Mennonite Development Work in Chad." The Oxford Handbook of Music and World Christianities, eds. Suzel Ana Reily and Jonathan Dueck. Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press. Chapter published online Jul 2015, and in print 2016. LINK

"Making Borrowed Songs: Mennonite Hymns, Appropriation, and Media." Christian Congregational Music: Performance, Identity and Experience, ed. Monique Ingalls, Carolyn Landau, and Thomas Wagner. Farnham, UK: Ashgate, 2013. 83-98.

"Binding and Loosing in Song: Canadian Mennonite Music, Conflict, and Identity," Ethnomusicology (Spring/Summer 2011): 229-254.

"Mennonite Choral Music Recordings of the West Coast Mennonite Chamber Choir," Journal of American Folklore 120:3 (2008): 348-360.

"Representation Wants to be Free: Opening Access to Ethnomusicological Publication." Folk  Music, Traditional Music, Ethnomusicology: Canadian Perspectives, Past and Present. Eds. Anna Hoefnagels and Gordon E. Smith. Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007. 109-32.

"Music and Development: MCC Workers in Chad" Conrad Grebel Review 25:1 (2007): 62-82.

"Encountering (Mennonite) Singer-Songwriters: J.D. Martin and Cate Friesen." Sound in the Land: Essays on Mennonites and Music. Eds. Maureen Epp, and Carol Ann Weaver. Kitchener: Pandora Press, 2006. 159-75.

"The State of the Art in Studies of Mennonite Music: Worship Wars, World Music, and Menno-Nots," Journal of Mennonite Studies 23 (2005): 131-45.

"Signifyin(g) on the City: Gang Starr's Work," Crossing Boundaries: An Interdisciplinary Journal 1:1 (2001): 65-83.

"From Whom is the Voice Coming? Mennonites, First Nations People and Appropriation of Voice," Journal of Mennonite Studies 19 (2001): 144-57.

Co-authored with Regula Qureshi; first author. "Music and Class in Canada." The Garland Encyclopedia of World Music: The United States and Canada (Volume 3). Ed. Koskoff Ellen. New York: Garland Publishing, 2001. 50-54.

 "Crossing the Street: Velour 100 and Christian Rock," Popular Music and Society 24:2 (2000): 127-48.

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