English

Programs & Courses

Programs

 
 
 
 

Courses

ENGL-1010 English Literature – Prose Fiction: (3.0 credit hours) This course will examine narrative, focusing on the genres of the novel and the short story, drawing upon a broad range of historical and contemporary literature from around the world, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. It will examine the complex relationship between form and content, reflecting on how words make meaning

ENGL-1020 English Literature – Poetry and Drama: (3.0 credit hours) This course will examine the genres of the play, the narrative poem and the lyrical poem, drawing upon a broad range of historical and contemporary literature from around the world, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. It will examine the complex relationship between form and content, reflecting on how words make meaning.

ENGL-1030 English Literature—Classical Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This course examines selections from Greek and Roman classical poetry and drama, upon which English literature draws (e.g., Homer, Virgil, Ovid, Aristophanes, Euripides, Sophocles). The readings may be organized around a theme.

ENGL-1040 English Literature—Narrative Film: (3.0 credit hours) An introduction to reading the cinema, with an emphasis on the appreciation and analysis of narrative film. This course will concentrate on the canon of influential North American and European films in the past century. Students will acquire a vocabulary of film criticism, with attention to genres, themes, and key theories. While we will consider film as entertainment and industry, our primary goal will be to examine significant films as works of art.

ENGL-1510 Introduction to Theatre: (3.0 credit hours) A study of the components of theatrical performance and the rehearsal process; an introduction to the basics of acting. Includes performance assignments.

ENGL-1531, 2531, 3531 Theatre Ensemble: (1.0 credit hour) An auditioned ensemble that will prepare and present a play which focuses on themes of peace and justice, or scriptural/sacred stories. It will explore table work, vocal technique, theories of movement and space, dramaturgy, and new play development. The ensemble will also focus on political theatre as a tool to affect social change. The ensemble will rehearse and perform a production for tour in Winnipeg and surrounding area.  Prerequisite:  A successful audition.

ENGL-1532, 2532, 3532 Theatre Workshop: (2.0 credit hours) Study and performance of a dramatic production. Prerequisite: Admission will be on the basis of an audition for an acting role or on the basis of an interview for a place in the production and technical design team.

ENGL-2030 Medieval Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This survey course studies the English literature of the Middle Ages, from its early development in Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, to the flourishing of poetry and drama in Middle English. It emphasizes the relationship between literature and its historical contexts, studying works such as Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales as well as mystical writings and morality and mystery plays. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2040 Renaissance Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This survey course studies the literature of the English Renaissance, from the sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century. It emphasizes the relationship between literature and its historical contexts, studying playwrights such as Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Jonson and pets such as the Sidneys, Donne, Herbert, and Milton. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2050 Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This survey course studies Restoration and Eighteenth-Century English literature. It emphasizes the relationship between literature and its historical contexts, studying authors such as Dryden, Bunyan, Behn, Swift, Pope, Burney, and Gay. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2060 Romantic and Victorian Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This survey course studies literature of the nineteenth century, principally British, and includes poetry, drama, non-fiction, and fiction. It emphasizes the relationship between literature and its historical contexts, studying authors such as Wordsworth, Keats, the Shelleys, Tennyson, George Eliot Newman, Ruskin, the Pre-Raphaelites, and Wilde. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2070 Modernist Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This survey course studies literature of the twentieth century, including poetry, drama, non-fiction, and fiction. The course emphasizes the relationship between literature and its historical contexts, studying authors such as Conrad, Woolf, Joyce, Yeats, Auden, T.S. Eliot, and Hemingway. The emphasis is on British modernism of the first half of the century, but the course may also consider other national literatures, as well as literary movements after modernism. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2400 Creative Writing—Non-fiction: (3.0 credit hours) This is a workshop-based course in non-fiction writing. Students will study models of accomplished writing and will produce a number of short pieces ranging from the autobiographic to the journalistic. Students will be expected, in addition to other work, to read and comment upon each other’s work. This is not a remedial writing course. Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-2410 Creative Writing—Short Fiction: (3.0 credit hours) This is a workshop-based course in writing short fiction. Students will be expected, in addition to other work, to read and comment upon each other’s work. Prerequisite: ENGL-1010 or instructor’s permission based on evaluation of student portfolio.

ENGL-2420 Creative Writing—Poetry: (3.0 credit hours) This is a workshop-based course in writing poetry. Students will be expected, in addition to other work, to read and comment upon each other’s work. Prerequisite: ENGL-1020 or instructor’s permission based on evaluation of student portfolio.

ENGL-2450 The Digital Word: (3.0 credit hours) From personal texting to massive databases, electronic text is everywhere.  But how does both the act of writing and text itself change in an electronic medium? This course considers the question in both practice and theory.  Students will learn the basics of textual encoding (using a mark-up language such as XML) and digital tools for studying texts, and will also consider digital culture more broadly, with a focus on literature as it is either remediated into digital forms or “born digital.” Prerequisite:  Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or six credit hours of courses in Bible.

ENGL-2520 Introduction to Literature for Theatre: (3.0 credit hours) A study of plays both as literature and as texts for stage presentation. The course provides an introduction to script analysis.

ENGL-2950 Topics in English: (3.0 credit hours) The content of this course will vary from year to year, depending on the needs of students and the interests and availability of instructors. Prerequisites: Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3000 The History of the Book: (3.0 credit hours) This course examines the book as a material and a conceptual object. It focuses on the development of writing technologies from stone tablets through the paper book and to electronic texts, asking centrally about the material history of the literature we read as well as our ideas about knowledge itself.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3010 Shakespeare: (3.0 credit hours) This course studies the dramas of William Shakespeare and asks both what they would have meant to their original audiences and why they remain popular today, four centuries later. Plays will include histories, comedies, tragedies, and romances.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

PHIL/ENGL-3010 Existentialism: (3:0 credit hours)  This course will examine select writings of authors who are described as “existentialist.” Possible authors to be studied include:  Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, Nietzsche, Weil, Camus, and de Beauvoir.  Broadly speaking, an author can be classified as “existentialist” if their primary concern is to discern the truth of the human person beyond the concepts and categories supplied by the natural, social, psychological, and moral sciences.  We will evaluate the authors’ critiques of these various frameworks as well as the forms of individual and social life they advocate in place of them. Prerequisite: 30 credit hours of university-level study.   

ENGL-3020 Studies in Sixteenth-Century Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This course will consider the literature of the sixteenth century, with a particular focus. The focus may be on a particular topic or a particular author or group of authors.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3030 Studies in Seventeenth-Century Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This course will consider the literature of the seventeenth century, with a particular focus. The focus may be on a particular topic or a particular author or group of authors.  Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3040 Nineteenth-Century Novel: (3.0 credit hours) This course is a study of the emergence of the novel as one of the dominant literary forms. We will investigate historical and theoretical contexts, research theories of the rise of the novel, and examine various styles such as comedy, realism, romance, and early examples of modernism. The reading list will emphasize influential British novels but may include North American and European titles. Authors may include Scott, Austen, Bronte, Dickens, James, George Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, Twain, Hawthorne, Dostoyevsky, Flaubert.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3050 The Novel Since 1900: (3.0 credit hours) The novel survived a rapid series of transformations in the past century, including the declaration of "the death of the novel," and remains a dominant form. Each version of this course will offer a survey of influential novels or focus on a national tradition or topic. Trends to be examined include modernism, postmodernism, and magic realism. Theoretical and cultural contexts will be studied, but the primary goal of the course is detailed study of individual novels.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3060 Canadian Literature: (3.0 credit hours) Students will investigate Canadian poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction and consider the political and historical issues involved in the creation of "Can Lit." The focus will vary and may include regional, aboriginal, Francophone, or Pre-Confederation voices. Major authors may include Stephen Leacock, Mordecai Richler, Margaret Atwood, Guy Vanderhaeghe, Rudy Wiebe, Michael Ondaatje, Robert Kroetsch, Michel Tremblay, P.K. Page, and Thomas King.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3070 World Literature in English: (3.0 credit hours) Some of the most exciting and challenging writing of the past decades belongs to the literatures of former British colonies. This course will consider the complex relationship between indigenous and colonist literary traditions and the development of national voices within the colonial structures of language and genre. Individual instructors will focus the course, usually on a particular place or topic. Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3080 Mennonite Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This course deals with literature that substantively engages the broad Mennonite experience, particularly in North America. It will primarily deal with recent Canadian and U.S. authors who write out of personal experience of Mennonite community, though not necessarily autobiographically. Texts will be studied in the context of Mennonite histories, cultures, and theologies.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3090 Studies in Medieval Literature: (3.0 credit hours) This course will consider the literature of the Middle Ages, with a particular focus. This focus may be on a particular topic or a particular author or group of authors. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3100 Short Fiction: (3.0 credit hours) This course will consider the short story and novella, from their origins (Aesop, Chaucer, Boccaccio, Grimm) through the flood of short fiction written from the mid-nineteenth century on, and on to present examples. The course will look at influential British, American, and Canadian short fiction (from Poe to Munro) and also at works in translation from around the world, including examples of realism, romanticism, modernism, fantasy, detective fiction, etc. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3110 Milton: (3.0 credit hours) This course examines the work of John Milton with particular emphasis on his epic poem Paradise Lost, and on other selections from his poetry and prose. Prerequisites: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

PHIL/BTS/ENGL-3120 Dante – The Divine Comedy: (3.0 credit hours) When, at the mid-point of his life, Dante found himself in the midst of a crisis, he turned to the dead to help him find his way. Equal parts literature, poetry, history, politics, philosophy, and theology, this course will follow Dante’s epic journey through hell, purgatory, and heaven as recorded in the Divine Comedy. Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040 OR 6 credit hours of 1000- or 2000-level philosophy or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3430 Literary Non-Fiction: (3.0 credit hours) This course will focus on the personal essay, a vital literary form that allows the writer informal and candid reflection on self and on social, political, and spiritual issues. We will study examples from ancient times to the present day and include memoirs, polemics, and comic essays. Our reading list will feature such famous essayists as Augustine, Montaigne, Lamb, Woolf, and Orwell. The focus will be on short essays but influential book-length non-fiction works will also be included.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3800 Reading Culture: (3.0 credit hours) An extension of the practices involved in reading written texts, this course includes the exploration and analysis of other cultural forms such as film, TV programming, and visual graphics, including photographs and advertising that participate in the cultural production of meaning. Attention will be given to theories of how meaning is constructed and exchanged.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL 3900 Major Authors: (3.0 credit hours)  This course will take up the work of a single author (or a combination of authors) with an aim to understanding the body of work of that author.  Choice of author and of approach will be made annually. Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3910 Literary Genres: (3.0 credit hours) This course will examine representative works from a chosen genre, such as chivalric romance, Petrarchan love poetry, Detective fiction, or Science Fiction.  Choice of genre will be made annually.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-3950 Topics in English: (3.0 credit hours) The content of this course will vary from year to year, depending on the needs of students and the interests and availability of instructors.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-4000 Senior Thesis in English: (6.0 credit hours) This course is restricted to students completing the Bachelor of Arts, four-year major. For information on eligibility, due dates, procedures, and requirements, students should request a document from the Registrar’s Office. Approval of the application will be contingent on the availability of faculty members to serve as thesis advisor and second reader.

ENGL-4200 Revenge: (3.0 credit hours) This course will explore the cultural and theological meanings of revenge through a range of literary forms including drama, narrative, poetry, and film, beginning with the tradition of the revenge tragedy. Why do so many revenge stories end in cataclysm? Out of what does the desire for revenge arise? Is the desire for revenge an endless response to injustice? What is forgiveness, and how might it interrupt the desire for revenge? Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040 OR 6 credit hours of introductory Bible and/or Theology.

ENGL-4800 Literary Theory: (3.0 credit hours) Students will be introduced to some of the many methods used to interpret literary material and helped to develop a theoretically informed approach to literature. Perspectives will include psychoanalytic theory, Marxism, feminism, New Criticism, reader-response criticism, New Historicism, postmodernist theory, and postcolonial theory. Students will develop greater self-consciousness about critical practice, the ability to ask new and different questions of texts, and the ability to cope with the complex vocabulary of modern criticism. Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

ENGL-4940 Independent Study in English: (3.0 credit hours) A study in a specific area of English under the direction of a faculty member.  Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, an additional 9 credit hours in English, and a minimum of 60 credit hours of university-level studies.

ENGL-4950 Topics in English: (3.0 credit hours) The content of this course will vary from year to year, depending on the needs of students and the interests and availability of instructors.  Prerequisite: Two of ENGL-1010, 1020, 1030, and 1040, or permission of the instructor.

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