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Holiday Inn Airport-West Invitational Men’s Basketball Tourn

For release October 14, 2010

The second-largest university men’s basketball tournament in Manitoba is happening this weekend – Thursday, Friday and Saturday, October 14 to 16 – when Winnipeg’s Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) Blazers host the first annual Holiday Inn Airport-West Invitational. The tournament takes place in CMU’s Loewen Athletic Centre.

Tournament entries include the University of Manitoba Bisons and The University of Winnipeg Wesmen of CIS Canada-West, along with Canadian Mennonite University Blazers of the Manitoba Colleges Athletic Conference, Briercrest Clippers from Caronport, Saskatchewan, Lakeland College Rustlers from Lloydminister, Alberta, and the Dakota College Bottineau (DCB) Lumberjacks from North Dakota.

Tournament play begins at October 14 at 6 p.m. when CMU Alumni Nick Miller and the Manitoba Bisons battle Briercrest Clippers. CMU Blazers then host high-flying Lakeland College from Lloydminister at 8 pm.

Friday, October 15 sees Lakeland Clippers take on the UWinnipeg Wesmen at 4 p.m., followed by a classic prairie rivalry between CMU and the Briercrest Clippers at 6 p.m. The final game of the evening sees Dakota College Bottineau of the National US Junior College league play the local University of Manitoba Bisons.

On Saturday, October 16, UWinnipeg and Briercreset go head to head at 4 p.m., then CMU Blazers tip-off with Dakota College Bottineau at 6 p.m., followed by DCB versus U of M @ 8 p.m.

The CMU Loewen Athletic Centre is located at 500 Shaftesbury Blvd. in Winnipeg.

Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) is a Christian university in the Anabaptist tradition, offering undergraduate degrees in arts and science, business and organizational administration, communications and media, peace and conflict resolution studies, music and music therapy, theology, and church ministries, as well as graduate degrees in Theological Studies and Christian ministry.

Located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CMU has over 1,800 students at its Shaftesbury Campus in southwest Winnipeg, at Menno Simons College in downtown Winnipeg, and enrolled through its Outtatown discipleship program. CMU is a Member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC).

Holiday Inn Airport-West Invitational Men’s Basketball Tournament Schedule

Thursday, October 14
U of M vs Briercrest @ 6pm
CMU vs Lakeland @ 8pm

Friday, October 15
Lakeland vs UWinnipeg @ 4pm
Briercrest vs CMU @ 6pm
DCB vs U of M @ 8pm

Saturday, October 16
UWinnipeg vs Briercrest @ 4pm
CMU vs DCB @ 6pm
U of M vs Lakeland @ 8pm


For Tournament or Athletics Department information, contact:
CMU Head Coach: Darcy Coss: mensbasketballcoach@cmu.ca
Athletic Director Russell Willms: rwillms@cmu.ca; 487-3300 ext. 690

For CMU general information, contact:
Nadine Kampen, CMU Communications & Marketing Director
nkampen@cmu.ca

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Inaugural Blazer Distinguished Community Service Award to Altona Citizen Ted Friesen

CMU award recognizes lifetime of achievement and service

ted friesen
ted friesen

For release September 28, 2010

CMU presented its inaugural Blazer Distinguished Community Service Award on September 25, 2010 naming Altona citizen Ted Friesen as the first recipient. The award recognizes distinguished achievement and service within the broader community or church, through business, leadership, artistic, political, or volunteer contributions. Presentation of the award was held in conjunction with CMU’s President’s Dinner during annual Homecoming Events.

“I am pleased to announce the Blazer Distinguished Community Service Award and feel privileged to introduce its inaugural recipient, Ted Friesen,” said CMU President Gerald Gerbrandt to a full house in CMU’s Great Hall.

Retired businessman Ted E. Friesen, together with his two brothers, further developed D.W. Friesen & Sons (now Friesens Corporation) into a major business, fully employee owned, and serving the community in significant ways. Throughout his career, Friesen has been an active participant in Mennonite Central Committee, the Canadian Conference of Mennonites, and Eden Mental Health. He also served as the Secretary and President of the Mennonite Historical Society of Canada for 28 years (1968 – 1996) and it was during this period that the three-volume Mennonites in Canada was published. A lifelong resident of Altona, Friesen is a founding member of the Altona Mennonite Church.

“I am very grateful for the honour bestowed on me on this occasion by CMU,” said Ted Friesen in accepting the award. “That feeling is also accompanied by a sense of humility when I remember colleagues and co-workers in the various organizations that I have been associated with in the past who would be as worthy if not more worthy for achievements in the area of our mutual work. So, as a survivor, I also accept this award remembering their contributions.”

Friesen began working with his father’s business at the age of 16, Gerbrandt said, noting that today, nearly 75 years later, Ted Friesen still walks across town to the company office, in summer and in winter. “Over the 35 years that Ted and his two brothers, Dave and Ray, led the business, they grew it into one of the premier, most technologically sophisticated printing companies in North America,” said Gerbrandt. “Ted, like his father and brothers, believed that a business should serve its community, and Friesens has modelled that commitment.”

Friesens Corporation has grown into a company of international status and prints for such organizations as National Geographic and major American universities. Not only is it the largest employer in Altona, said Gerbrandt, the employees actually own the company in a unique employee ownership structure

Gerbrandt noted that, besides being an outstanding businessman, Ted Friesen is a churchman and an involved community citizen. “Ted grew up in the Altona Bergthaler Church, and remained active there for many years. Later, he became a founding member of Altona Mennonite, where he and Linie remain active. As a young man, he became involved with the Board of Christian Service of the Canadian Conference,” said Gerbrandt, “and in 1964 he was on the first executive of MCC Canada, helping to establish MCC’s office in Ottawa in 1970.” His involvement with MCC developed his conviction that Mennonites in Canada needed their history told, said Gerbrandt, which led to the establishment of the Mennonite Historical Society of Canada in 1968,

“I worked in two communities,” Friesen commented, “the local one, which is the Altona community; and the community of Canada, on the board level of Mennonite Central Committee and the Mennonite Historical Society of Canada and other organizations. When I look at all of these today, I am amazed at how they have grown from humble beginnings and have reached a position that is making a significant impact today, in today’s society, both in the Mennonite and in the larger community. I rejoice that past efforts have been blessed beyond all expectations.”

Gerbrandt further noted Ted’s passion for quality classical music, observing that Ted and Linie raised their family to appreciate fine music and today remain regular attendees at concerts. “Many a young musician has been encouraged through support from Ted and Linie,” said Gerbrandt.

Gerbrandt expressed the appreciation and gratitude of the CMU community for Ted Friesen’s lifelong service to the community: “Thank you, Ted Friesen.”

“I want to give tribute to my good wife Linie and my family who have been very, very supportive all the way. And, in closing,” said Friesen, “I simply want to say with JS Bach, Soli deo Gloria – to God be the Glory.”

Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) is a Christian university in the Anabaptist tradition, offering undergraduate degrees in arts and science, business and organizational administration, communications and media, peace and conflict resolution studies, music and music therapy, theology, and church ministries, as well as graduate degrees in Theological Studies and Christian ministry. Located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CMU has over 1,800 students at its Shaftesbury Campus in Southwest Winnipeg, at Menno Simons College in downtown Winnipeg, and enrolled through its Outtatown discipleship school. CMU is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC).

Media contact:
Nadine Kampen, CMU Communications & Marketing Director
nkampen@cmu.ca;
204.487.3300 Ext. 621
Canadian Mennonite University
500 Shaftesbury Blvd., Winnipeg, MB R3P 2N2

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Dr. John Brubacher’s speech from Science Lab opening

University science departments today face many challenges, not least the call to teach more students with fewer staff, and less money. As
a result, the pressure is on to cut costs and make efficient use of time…and laboratory components of classes represent some of the more
expensive and labour-intensive aspects of science education. Since my days as an undergraduate student, there has been a gradual trend
– to reduce the number of laboratory classes in a semester, or to drop lab components of courses and replace them with problem sets, more
lectures, or more recently virtual, computer-based labs.
This trend is disturbing, for two reasons (well, more than two, but time is limited).
First, it deprives students of the opportunity to actually do science. Imagine if music performance majors didn’t play instruments or sing
until their senior year, or if athletes trained without playing their sport, until they registered in “Basketball 495, Senior Practicum”. Of
course, those would be rather absurd situations, but as an analogy of how science programs are typically structured, increasingly it’s not far
off.* Of course, history and theory have their place in science education, but they can’t be everything. Because doing science is very much an
art – there are manual skills involved in manipulating equipment, skills of intuition needed to frame an interesting question, and formulate
and test hypotheses to attempt to answer it, skills of flexibility and patience to work with and explain the often ambiguous, messy results of
real-world experiments…
If we want to produce insightful, creative scientists, or professionals in science-based fields like medicine, engineering, or even a citizenry
that can truly be described as scientifically literate, we need to give our students the opportunity to practice doing science. That’s what this
lab is for.
Second, beyond just gaining skill in scientific investigation, there are less-tangible benefits to laboratory education that are difficult for
students to replicate by reading a textbook or listening to a lecture. My job, as a biology teacher, is to invite my students to fall in love with
biology as a field of study. That can be done via lectures, yes, but there’s something much more alluring about science when one has the op-
portunity to actually try their hand at it.
My father taught chemistry at the University of Waterloo for over 30 years. I once asked him why he chose to go into chemistry in the first
place. His answer was that more than anything else, it was the vivid colours and strange smells of chemical solutions that drew him in.
A few years ago, I found my PhD advisor, on a particularly stressful, no-good, very bad day, sitting at the microscope looking at grasshopper
ovaries, which had little to do with anything that needed doing at the time. He just looked up at me and said, “I decided I needed to look at
beautiful things for a while,”. Doing science is a sensory experience, and in many ways, a return to being a kid and being thrilled at discov-
ering how something is put together, or how one thing leads to another.
This fall, students in my introductory biology class will meet a species of bacterium that infects plants, and actually genetically engineers its
host, forcing the plant to provide food and shelter. Later in the term, they will bring in food or other household items, and test them for their
tendency to cause mutations in bacteria, and most likely be stunned, fascinated, and perhaps disturbed by what they discover. And just
maybe, they’ll start to fall in love.
That course is just one among seven that will use this facility this school year. It’s a small facility, but it’s a good one, and it allows my col-
leagues and I to develop curricula that will give our students opportunities they would not have in similar courses at other institutions.
That’s why this laboratory is so important, and that is why I want to say a big thank-you to two levels of government, and a number of
donors – the Duecks in particular – for your support in making this kind of education possible. I hope and pray that this facility, and those
of us who work in it, will be worthy of the faith and goodwill you have shown us.
* Lindgren, Clark (2010) “Teaching by doing: turning a biology curriculum upside down.” Skeptic 15(4):35-37.
September 3, 2010
John Brubacher, Professor of Biology, gave a speech at the opening of CMU’s new Science Lab:

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General News

GOVERNMENTS OF CANADA AND MANITOBA COMPLETE FIRST KNOWLEDGE INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECT IN MANITOBA

Canadian Mennonite University Hosts Grand Opening of New Science Laboratory

Terry Schellenberg, Premier Greg Sellinger, Gerald Gerbrandt, Martha Dueck, Raymond Dueck, Min. Steven Fletcher, MP

Premier Greg Selinger, MP Steven Fletcher, Minister of State for Democratic Reform, and Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) President Dr. Gerald Gerbrandt today proudly opened CMU’s new science laboratory that will benefit students for many years to come.

“This advanced laboratory setting will strengthen CMU’s science programs and support high-quality instruction for students,” said Premier Selinger. “Our government is pleased to be part of the ongoing co-operation with the federal government under the Knowledge Infrastructure Program.”

Canadian Mennonite University received a total of $301,500 from the federal government under the federal and provincial partnership agreement in the Knowledge Infrastructure Program (KIP), with Manitoba providing an additional $150,800. CMU held a successful fundraising campaign for the project and raised over $350,000 in support from private donors towards the facility.

CMU students now have a new 1,200-square-foot teaching laboratory, a preparatory lab and improved storage facilities. The specialized space will allow the institution to grow its course offerings and teach advanced-level science courses with lab components in biochemistry, organic chemistry, physics, genetics, cell biology and microbiology.

“Our government’s investment in post-secondary infrastructure has given our students and researchers the tools they need to be global leaders in their fields and pursue world-class excellence,” said Minister Fletcher. “Our government’s investments in the knowledge economy strengthen Canada’s position as a world leader in science and technology.”

“Increasingly, students are coming to CMU looking to build an academic base in the sciences for such professional fields as nursing, agriculture, medicine, pharmacy, engineering and education. We are grateful for the support of our federal and provincial governments and private donors to build this new lab, which considerably strengthens CMU’s capacity to deliver a broadly-based, Christian liberal-arts education. Students seeking a future in science will have a strong foundation to begin that journey,” said Gerbrandt.

The KIP investment is part of the federal government’s two-year, $2-billion plan to repair and expand research and educational facilities at Canadian colleges and universities. Since its inception last year, KIP has helped to generate the advanced technological infrastructure needed to keep Canada’s colleges and universities at the forefront of scientific advancement.

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CMU Press Author Dora Dueck To Give Reading In Steinbach

For release July 23, 2010

Winnipeg author Dora Dueck will be reading and signing her second novel, This Hidden Thing, in Lichtenau Church at the Mennonite Heritage Village on Monday, August 2, at 1:30 pm.

This Hidden Thing tells the story of Maria Klassen, a young Mennonite woman who has recently emigrated from Russia. She soon finds work as domestic for a wealthy English family in Winnipeg, while her family settles in the nearby town of Winkler. Later in the novel, we meet Maria in adulthood – devout, industrious, and dedicated to her family. Yet she is reserved and intensely private. This is the story of a life that contained passion and suffering that no one knew.

Dora Dueck is the co-editor of Northern Lights: An Anthology of Contemporary Christian Writing in Canada. Her stories have been featured on CBC Radio, and in journals such as Room, Prairie Fire, Rhubarb, and Journal of Mennonite Studies.

For more information about This Hidden Thing, visit www.cmu.ca/cmupress.

CMU PRESS is an academic publisher of scholarly, reference, and general interest books at Canadian Mennonite University. Books from CMU Press address and inform interests and issues vital to the university, its constituency, and society. Areas of specialization include Mennonite studies, and works that are church-oriented or theologically engaged.

Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) is a Christian university in the Anabaptist tradition, offering undergraduate degrees in arts and science, business and organizational administration, communications and media, peace and conflict resolution studies, music and music therapy, theology, and church ministries, as well as graduate degrees in Theological Studies and Christian ministry. Located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CMU is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC). Visit www.cmu.ca

For CMU PRESS information, contact:
Jonathan Dyck , CMU PRESS Project Manager
cmupress@cmu.ca
204.487.3300.

For CMU information, contact:
Nadine Kampen, CMU Communications & Marketing Director
nkampen@cmu.ca
Tel. 204.487.3300 Ext. 621

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Hot Pursuit Riders Post Record Times, Complete Race On July 21, 2010

For release July 21, 2010
Arvid Loewen posted a tremendous personal best over this race distance that saw him reach the perimeter of Winnipeg at 12:43 pm, a time that shaved 18 hours off of earlier rides. Loewen arrived downtown at the Legislature today at 1:45 pm, accompanied through town by a police escort and met by a large crowd of supporters and the other Hot Pursuit riders. Loewen raced solo in support of the Mully Children’s Family Charitable Foundation, riding at record pace from July 17, 7:00 a.m. through to July 21, 1:45 p.m., stopping only 4 hours per day for rest periods. For race statistics, visit www.hotpursuit2010.com/Hot_Pursuit/Home.html

Says crew member Paul Loewen: “Arvid biked 2330km in 99h 43m. Of that time, 14 hours was off bike. So his riding time was about 86 hours. That makes his on-bike average about 27km/h. His previous best was 118 hours, so he beat that time by 18 hours.”

Team CMU, racing in relay format with five riders cycling non-stop from July 18 to July 21, for a total of 65 hours, reached the Legislature at 2:43 am July 21, posting a race finish time of 2:01 am at the perimeter. Team CMU finished 19 hours ahead of their estimated racing time. Team CMU’s fundraising efforts will provide financial support for CMU’s international student financial assistance programs and practica. Riding for Team CMU were CMU faculty members Chris Huebner and John Brubacher, along with Kevin Kilbrei, and alumni Craig Penner and Jon Guenter.

The Gogos team of four women “grannies,’ including 80-year old Shirley Polson along with Elsie McKinnon, Evely Ko, and Jo Maetche, completed their race from Calgary to Winnipeg this morning, also riding in support of the Mully Children’s Family Charitable Foundation.
The Gogos riders were cycling today at a pace of 31.5 km per hour. Because Arvid was out in front of them, they decided to end their race 10 kilometeres past Portage la Prairie and drive the final stretch in their van, in order to arrive in Winnipeg on time to welcome Arvid at the finish.

“This is about the children of the Mully Children’s Family and support for them,” says crew member Maureen Kehler. “We really wanted to support the work that Arvid does, and we wanted to help welcome him at the end.” The team ended their race logging 45 hours and 52 minutes and estimated that had they continued at that pace, their arrival at Winnipeg’s perimeter would have been at 1:28 pm.

Team Winnipeg Police accompanied Arvid on the final leg of his journey as part of a police escort. Although circumstances caused Team WPS to withdraw part way through the race, the team continued their support for Hot Pursuit in raising funds for The Children’s Wish Foundation.

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Hot Pursuit Race Begins Saturday, July 17 In BC

Solo rider Arvid Loewen leaves White Rock July 17; pursuit riders start July 18
For release July 15, 2010

Arvid Loewen opens the race on July 17 at 7:00 am, with Team CMU leaving 24 hours later and Team WP leaving 27 hours later. The solo and team riders will cover 2330 kilometres in a round-the-clock race back to Winnipeg.

The two Winnipeg pursuit teams will attempt to overtake Arvid Loewen, who is racing for the Mully Children’s Foundation. CMU’s team of five cyclists, made up of faculty members Chris Huebner and John Brubacher, along with Kevin Kilbrei, and alumni Craig Penner and Jon Guenter, will race from Vancouver to Winnipeg to raise money for international student financial support. Team Winnipeg Police are raising funds for The Children’s Wish Foundation. Riders anticipate arriving at Manitoba’s legislative grounds on Wednesday evening, July 21.

Team GoGo joins the race at Calgary. Shirley Polson, 80 years of age, and four of her “granny” friends will leave Calgary as a relay team on July 18 at 8:00 am. They expect to be in Winnipeg in advance of the other teams, waiting at the finish line for the riders. They have named their team the “Gogos” after the Kenyan word for “grandmother.”

“Arvid has incredible endurance and can cycle 20 hours a day,” says Team CMU’s Chris Huebner. “We are not in his league, but we will be working as a team, cycling day and night, trying to catch him.”

Located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CMU has over 1,800 students at its Shaftesbury Campus in Southwest Winnipeg, at Menno Simons College in downtown Winnipeg, and enrolled through its Outtatown discipleship program. CMU is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC).


SEE CONTACT DETAILS BELOW…

See websites (listed below) for:
daily race updates
race progress maps
blog commentary
photo galleries
audio/video files

www.hotpursuit2010.com/Hot_Pursuit/Home.html
www.cmu.ca/hotpursuit
www.wpscopsforkids.ca


MEDIA CONTACT IN WINNIPEG
Nadine Kampen nkampen@cmu.ca
204.487.3300 ext. 621 | toll free 1.877.231.4570

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History Group Hosted with goal of “MAPPING THE PAGES”

Research focuses on Canadian Prairie public and private collections

For release July 14, 2010

Canadian Mennonite University recently hosted a meeting of a unique history research group comprised of scholars from the University of Saskatchewan, the University of Manitoba, and CMU. With a special project of “Mapping the Pages,” the group’s purpose is to bring to light the little-known, unknown, or otherwise surprising medieval and early modern books that are in Canadian Prairie collections, either public or private.

“This group is developing a database that will facilitate the gathering of information about these books as well as their further study,” says CMU Associate Professor of English Paul Dyck. “One of the goals is that book owners will be able to enter information about their own books in the database. We see this is a natural and promising connection between our institutions and the public, and an important way to capture and share information about unique and valuable history resources.”

The project is headed by Sharon Wright of St. Thomas More College, with STMC providing support for travel, meals, and accommodation, and the host institution, CMU, providing meeting space and a luncheon meal. The group held its first meeting last year at Notre Dame in Wilcox, Saskatchewan. This second meeting, held June 28 & 29, included trips to the University of Manitoba’s Archives and Special Collections, the Mennonite Heritage Center Archives, and the Hudson’s Bay Archives, as well as to CMU’s letterpress print shop.

2010 meeting participants were Dietrich Bartel (CMU), Sarah Benson (Theological Union, U of S), Paul Dyck (CMU), Frank Klassen (U of S), Shelley Sweeney (U of M), David Watt (U of M), and Sharon Wright (STMC).

Canadian Mennonite University is a Christian university in the Anabaptist tradition, offering a broad range of undergraduate degrees and two graduate degree programs. CMU has over 1,800 students, including Menno Simons College and Outtatown students, and is member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC) .

For information, contact:
Nadine Kampen
CMU Communications & Marketing Director
nkampen@cmu.ca; 204.487.3300 Ext. 621

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New Book From CMU Press Brings Radical Orthodoxy Into Dialogue With Radical Reformation Theology

Essay collection includes works by theologians Craig Hovey, Harry Huebner and Stephen Long
For release July 5, 2010

CMU PRESS is pleased to announce the publication of The Gift of Difference: Radical Orthodoxy, Radical Reformation edited by Chris K. Huebner and Tripp York. The Gift of Difference is a collection of essays in which theologians such as Craig Hovey, Harry J. Huebner, and D. Stephen Long consider the strengths and weaknesses of Radical Orthodoxy in dialogue with the Radical Reformation tradition. Writers in this volume engage topics such as ecclesiology, martyrdom, worship, oath-taking, peace and violence.

In recent years, Radical Orthodoxy has become an important and influential movement in contemporary theology and philosophy. Spearheaded by John Milbank, Catherine Pickstock and Graham Ward, Radical Orthodoxy enlists the resources of classical theology to engage the current strongholds of secular and religious thought.

Proponents of Radical Orthodoxy argue that the Enlightenment project to remove reason, ethics, politics and economics from a theological framework culminates in the nihilism of postmodern discourse. They suggest that much contemporary theology is idolatrous in nature because it takes the isolation of such disciplines for granted.

In the Foreword, John Milbank writes that “[modern Mennonites] see the Church itself as the true polity and (unlike most of the magisterial Reformation) they see the possibility of ‘living beyond the law’ in terms of a new sort of social and political practice.” What might this concrete expression of Christian discipleship have to suggest to a movement like Radical Orthodoxy? What gifts does Radical Orthodoxy offer academics, ministers and laypeople from Radical Reformation tradition?

“This book explores both common and divergent themes between Anabaptist/Mennonite theologians and their counterparts in the Radical Orthodoxy movement,” says co-editor Chris K. Huebner. “For example, while they jointly reject as false the dualisms characteristic of modernity, the manner in which questions of peace and justice get framed remains an ongoing debate.”

Chris K. Huebner is Associate Professor of Theology and Philosophy at Canadian Mennonite University. He is the author of A Precarious Peace: Yoderian Explorations on Theology, Knowledge, and Identity (Herald Press, 2006) and co-editor, with Peter Dula, of The New Yoder (Wipf & Stock, 2010).

Tripp York is an Instructor of Religious Studies at Western Kentucky University in Bowling Green, Kentucky. He is the author of The Purple Crown: The Politics of Martyrdom (Herald Press, 2007) and Living on Hope While Living in Babylon: The Christian Anarchists of the 20th Century (Wipf & Stock, 2009).

The Gift of Difference: Radical Orthodoxy, Radical Reformation (CMU PRESS) is available from the CMU Bookstore, located at 600 Shaftesbury Blvd., Winnipeg. Contact cmubookstore@cmu.ca; telephone 204.487.3300. The cost is $29.50.

CMU PRESS is an academic publisher of scholarly, reference, and general interest books at Canadian Mennonite University. Books from CMU Press address and inform interests and issues vital to the university, its constituency, and society. Areas of specialization include Mennonite studies and works that are church-oriented or theologically engaged. Visit www.cmu.ca/cmupress

Canadian Mennonite University (CMU) is a Christian university in the Anabaptist tradition, offering undergraduate degrees in arts and science, business, communications, peace and conflict resolution studies, music, theology, and church ministries, as well as graduate degrees in Theological Studies and Christian ministry. Located in Winnipeg, Manitoba, CMU is a member of the Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC).

For CMU PRESS information, contact:
Jonathan Dyck CMU PRESS Project Manager
cmupress@cmu.ca
204.487.3300.

For CMU information, contact:
Nadine Kampen CMU Communications & Marketing Director
nkampen@cmu.ca
Tel. 204.487.3300 Ext. 621

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Hot Pursuit 2010 Media Advisory

TRAINING RACE & NEWS CONFERENCE JUNE 28 8:00 AM

This summer (July 17-21), as a charitable fundraising event, Hot Pursuit 2010 will take ultra-marathon cyclist Arvid Loewen from White Rock, BC, to Winnipeg, MB, in under five days. He will be chased by pursuit relay teams leaving White Rock only 24 hours behind him. Four members of the Winnipeg Police Service and five professors and alumni from Canadian Mennonite University will race after him in the ultimate HOT PURSUIT. Along the way, a team of four “grannies” relaying from Calgary to Winnipeg will join the competition, with Arvid and the grannies are all riding in support of Mully Children’s Family (MCF). The Winnipeg Police riders are raising funds for Children’s Wish Foundation; and the Canadian Mennonite University team is raising funds to help bring international students to CMU.
Together, they make up HOT PURSUIT 2010.

JOIN US THIS MONDAY FOR INTERVIEWS WITH WINNIPEG’S HOT PURSUIT RIDERS
AS THEY COMPLETE THEIR 24-HOUR PRE-EVENT TRAINING RACE
Date: Monday, June 28, 2010
June 28 News Event: Hot Pursuit Riders will gather for a road-side news conference at the close of their 24-hour training race
News Event Location: Hyland Park, North of Winnipeg’s Perimeter Highway, west side of Henderson Highway
Participants:
Ultra-marathon cyclist Arvid Loewen
Winnipeg Police Department Riders
Canadian Mennonite University Riders
(The “GoGo Grannies” team, cycling for The Mully Foundation, join the pursuit once it reaches Calgary and are not available at the June 28 raining ride and news conference).
June 27-28 TrainingRace: Training race commences Sunday 8 am and continues until Monday 8 am
Training Ride Location: Commencing in Birds Hill Park, with a route change to external highways after 11 pm and overnight.

MEDIA MATERIALS will be available for radio, tv and print coverage of Hot Pursuit.
Hot Pursuit communication units travelling with the teams and stationed in Winnipeg will provide daily updates via blog postings complete with audio and video sound clips and photographs made available regularly throughout the race.

LOGISTICS OF RACE FINALE
The pursuit riders intend to reach Winnipeg’s Legislative buildings on July 21, between 4 pm and 10 pm

Winnipeg Media Contact for Hot Pursuit 2010:
Nadine Kampen: nkampen@cmu.ca; 487.3300 ext. 621

Race information contacts:
Arvid Loewen: arloewen@gmail.com Home 204-667-0445; Cell 204-996-8758
Team CMU Contact Chris Huebner: chuebner@cmu.ca; 229-5949 (cell preferred); 772-6813 (h)
Team Cops for Kids Winnipeg Police Contact Cst. Darrell Hees: dhees@winnipeg.ca (204)986-7386 (w); (204)612.8398 (c)

Website information sources:
www.cmu.ca/hotpursuit
www.hotpursuit2010.com/Hot_Pursuit/Home.html
www.wpscopsforkids.ca

To view CMU Hot Pursuit web photos, visit: http://picasaweb.google.com/cmumedia/HotPursuitTrainingRaceNewsConference#